Top 10 Man Buns of 2013


Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleson

2013 has been a unique year for celebrity hair styles. Females artists such as Jennifer Lawrence, Rihanna and Miley Cyrus have chopped their luscious locks into textured boy cuts. Male celebrities, on the other hand, are growing their shiny strands into a new trendy style affectionately referred to as the man bun. On this list are some of the more famous man bun pioneers, but 2013 saw a massive increase in young actors testing out the look. Here’s hoping they are not making New Year’s resolutions look like Fabio in 2014.

10. Cole Sprouse

Cole and Dylan Sprouse

Dylan Sprouse may have stolen the spotlight recently for his “leaked” nude photos, but Cole is the one with the most to show for 2013. He spent his year at school in New York, lengthening his locks into what can only be called a man mane. His placement on this list is well deserved due to his spectacular use of his hair at Halloween to dress up as Howl from “Howl’s Moving Castle”.

9. Chord Overstreet

Chord Overstreet

This pouty, trouty faced actor is one of a short list of male television stars that were rocking an updo this year.  He was awarded the “Male Scene Stealer” award at the Teen Choice Awards, but in reality, he owes that honor to the new ‘do.

8. Russell Brand

Russell Brand

What a year for Russell and his trademark hair. He may not have started the political revolution he had hoped for, but this fit Brit sparked the latest “long hair, don’t care” trend. Although Brand prefers to let it all hang loose, this bun clad gentleman is not afraid to play the matching game with his female friends.

7. Chris Hemsworth

Chris Hemsworth

This Australian heartthrob is best known for saving the world with his giant hammer in “Thor”. Hemsworth and his hair starred in a sequel that was released this year garnering him positive reviews.

6. Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell

This Irish star has been consistently releasing films since the late 90’s. His accent and edgy sense of humor are complimented nicely by his latest hipster inspired top knot. Farrell is quoted as saying he had trichotillomania, a compulsion to pull out his own hair because he “loved the sensation”. I for one am happy those days are far behind him, Farrell is not a dish best served bald.

5.Bradley Cooper

Bradley Cooper

In one of  Bradley Cooper’s blockbuster hits of 2013, “American Hustle”, he is shown with a head full of small curlers in an attempt to achieve perm-like flow. The dedication shown in the film to attain a miniature afro thankfully did not influence his ever casual man bun of choice.

4. Leonardo DiCaprio

Leonardo Dicaprio

Leonardo DiCaprio, the king of the on screen “cheers”, has been experimenting with his off-screen hair. In 2013, DiCaprio was spotted keeping his bangs out of his face with a Pebbles inspired ponytail. This spiky, half updo has had almost as much attention as the actor it is attached to this year.

3.Jared Leto

Jared Leto

This rock star, actor, style icon triple-threat is not inexperienced when it comes to the man bun. His hair is so famous that there are entire websites dedicated to its greatness such as this one.

2.Brad Pitt

Brad Pitt

Brad Pitt, the sexiest father in the Hollywood realm, has been lengthening his locks in the last few years. Pitt, just like the rings of an aging tree, is measuring passing years in inches of hair on his head. With so many children running around the Jolie-Pitt house, it is astounding that there isn’t a strand of grey hair atop his pristine head.

1. Jordan Coop

Jordan Coop

Rounding out the best man buns of 2013 is FIMS’ own Jordan Coop. None gracing this list are as wise as the former faculty president, and he keeps every strand of that critical knowledge tied up in a stylish blond man bun. He sports the look with an equally blond beard, a combination that every hipster wishes they could pull off. A quintessential man of MIT, Coop surpasses all other celebrity man bun greats.

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7 thoughts on “Top 10 Man Buns of 2013

      • I’m not, but that’s beside the point.

        I don’t think I’m in the wrong for expecting more from a so-called alternative student publication. OPENWIDE isn’t (or at least it shouldn’t be) BuzzFeed; the readers–and more importantly the writers and editors–should be able to comprehend this.

        And don’t get me wrong, I don’t mean to solely condemn this article. It just had the unlucky fate of being the most recent in a long list of imprudent, populist decisions made on behalf of the OPENWIDE editorial staff.

        • As an OPENWIDE editor, I’d have to disagree with this “long list” of populist material you speak of. While the recent top 10 lists might not encapsulate the hard-hitting, radical and provocative content that OPENWIDE is well-known for, who’s to say that the occasional light read is such an abysmal thing. This article is a good laugh and has received positive feedback from FIMS students and those outside of the faculty. It’s healthy to take an occasional step outside of the relentless cynicism that FIMS tends to procure and appreciate some lighter, more humorously-inclined topics, such as these. If you’re committed to cold-blooded cynicism, skip this one – just remember that you’re not the exclusive member of our audience. Looking back at the majority of articles posted on here this year, I’d say they’ve been in keeping with the critical content that you and we (the editorial staff) like to see; they certainly haven’t been a long list of a populist, Buzzfeed-esque material as you suggest.

          (On the other hand, maybe we included these top 10 lists as a subversive guerrilla tactic to draw more of the teeming masses to our critical, radical and provocative content!)

          • And to call the latest cover vapid is just plain wrong (though arguably, so is starting a sentence with ‘and’). If you looked beyond the breasts, you might have noticed the satirical jab we took at the university crest and the increasingly branded experience the university offers students (being sold to advertisers in an environment of education), highlighted by the fact that that crest was branded right onto a student’s body. Its called a metaphor, and to objectify the human body in the way that we chose to (the gender is unimportant) just drives the point home even further.

            If you have further concerns please write me a letter, or email openwidezine@gmail.com

            Chris Ling
            Editor-in-chief

          • >This article is a good laugh and has received positive feedback from FIMS students and those outside of the faculty.

            In the same sense I wouldn’t expect Adbusters to publish a piece titled “5 Must-Have Christmas Items,” I also wouldn’t expect the ‘zine to publish BuzzFeed-esque, Facebook share-bait. I realize OPENWIDE isn’t and never was quite the radical publication it’s been touted as (and this was true even when I was a member of the editorial staff), but I think it’s more than a little disingenuous to defend such a great thematic misstep as nothing more than a good laugh. You might’ve reached a broader audience, but you’ve simultaneously ostracized (what I would hope is) your core audience. Apologies, but I was hoping for a more socially-relevant series of end-of-the-year lists (even the drag article, which I thought had significant potential, turned out to be all style no substance).

            >If you’re committed to cold-blooded cynicism, skip this one – just remember that you’re not the exclusive member of our audience.

            I am committed to cold-blooded cynicism–otherwise known as criticality–and I believe the OPENWIDE editorial staff should be as well. Occasionally a publication needs to take an elitist, Lippmann-esque stance; that is, you need to write at an audience, not for an audience.

            >Looking back at the majority of articles posted on here this year, I’d say they’ve been in keeping with the critical content that you and we (the editorial staff) like to see

            Don’t misunderstand. I think OPENWIDE’s published some great articles this year (the ‘magnum opus’ of course being Coop’s piece on O-Week policy); I’ve just noticed an alarming trend towards surface critique and playfully insubstantial articles over the past couple years (not entirely this current staff’s fault, I grant you). This recent string of articles was just a breaking-point. I realize you’re often struggling for content, but I would appreciate a firmer editorial delineation of thematically-relevant/teen-blog-worthy content.

            >Its called a metaphor, and to objectify the human body in the way that we chose to (the gender is unimportant) just drives the point home even further.

            I understood the metaphor (though upon hearing your explanation, it seems I read further into it), I just found it distasteful and somewhat incongruous when (seemingly) paired with an article on the branding of women’s bodies on campus, regardless of satirical intentions. To be honest, I was on the fence about the cover (hence me deleting that section of my comment), but upon hearing your defense, I think my initial skepticism’s been reaffirmed. Gender is never unimportant in image.

            And honestly, I criticize because I love. I see the ‘zine’s potential, and I don’t want to see it squandered. As a consumer of, and past contributor to, this publication, I want nothing but the best for it, and I figured voicing my opinion would be better than stewing in dissatisfaction.

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